Notes

Notes to the consolidated financial statements

Basic information on the Group

Elisa Corporation (“Elisa” or “the Group”) engages in telecommunications activities and provides ICT and online services in Finland and in selected international market areas. The parent company of the Group is Elisa Corporation (“the parent”) domiciled in Helsinki, and its registered address is Ratavartijankatu 5. The shares of the parent company, Elisa Corporation, have been listed on the Nasdaq Helsinki since 1997.

On 26 January 2017 Elisa's Board of Directors accepted this financial statement for publication. A copy of the consolidated financial statements is available from Elisa’s head office at Ratavartijankatu 5, Helsinki, or on the company’s website at corporate.elisa.com.

Basis of presentation of financial statements

Elisa’s consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), including adherence to IAS and IFRS standards and SIC and IFRIC interpretations valid as at 31 December 2016. In the Finnish Accounting Act and the provisions issued pursuant to it, the International Financial Reporting Standards refer to standards and interpretations that have been approved for application in the EU according to the procedures provided for in EU regulation (EC) No. 1606/2002 (“IFRS”). The notes to the consolidated financial statements are also compliant with Finnish accounting and corporate legislation.

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, except for financial assets available-for-sale, financial assets and liabilities recognised at fair value through profit or loss, share-based payments and derivatives. The financial statements are presented in EUR million and the figures are rounded to one decimal place.

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires the application of judgment by the Group management in making estimates and decisions. Information on decisions requiring management judgment on the application of appropriate accounting principles that have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements are presented in the accounting principles under ”Accounting policies that require management’s judgments and sources of estimation uncertainty”.  

Applied new and revised standards and interpretations

The Annual Improvements of IFRS standards adopted as of 1 January 2016 did not have an impact on the consolidated financial statement.

Consolidated accounting principles

Combination principles

Subsidiaries

The consolidated financial statements include the parent company, Elisa Corporation, and those subsidiaries in which the Group has control. Control is obtained when the Group is exposed, or has the right, to variable returns through its power over the entity.

Subsidiaries are consolidated from the date the Group obtains control and divested companies until the loss of control. The acquisition method is used in the accounting for the elimination of internal ownership. All intra-group transactions, gains on the sale of inventories and fixed assets, intra-group receivables, payables and dividends are eliminated.

Changes in the parent’s ownership interest in a subsidiary that do not result in a loss of control are accounted for as equity transactions. As at the date when control is lost, any investment retained in the former subsidiary is recognised at fair value and the difference is recorded through profit or loss. Identifiable assets acquired and assumed liabilities are measured at their fair value as of the acquisition date. Changes in the contingent consideration and acquisition-related expenses are recognised as an expense in the income statement. In a business combination carried out in stages, the previously held equity interest in the acquiree is measured again at its acquisition-date fair value and the resulting gain or loss is recognised in profit or loss. A gain resulting from a bargain purchase is recognised in profit or loss.  

Non-controlling interests are measured either at the amount which equals proportionate share of the non-controlling interests in the recognised amounts of the acquiree's identifiable net assets or at fair value. The method to be used is selected on a case-by-case basis. Changes in non-controlling interests are recognised in retained earnings.

Profit for the period attributable to the equity holders of the parent and non-controlling interests is presented separately in the consolidated income statement. Non-controlling interests are presented separately from the equity of the owners of the parent in the consolidated statement of financial position. Losses exceeding the share of ownership are allocated to non-controlling interests.

Associated companies

Associated companies are entities over which the Group exercises significant influence. Significant influence is presumed to exist when the Group owns over 20 per cent of the voting rights of the company or when the Group otherwise exercises significant influence but does not exercise control. Associated companies are consolidated in accordance with the equity method. If the Group’s share of losses of an associated company exceeds its interest in the associated company, the investment is recognised on the balance sheet at zero value and the Group discontinues recognising its share of further losses unless the Group has other obligations for the associated company. Associated companies are consolidated from the date the company becomes an associated company and divested companies are consolidated until the date of disposal.

Joint arrangements

Joint arrangements are arrangements over which the Group exercises joint control with one or more parties. A joint arrangement is either a joint operation or a joint venture. A joint venture is a joint arrangement where the Group has rights to the net assets of the arrangement. A joint operation is a joint arrangement where the Group has rights to the assets and obligations for the liabilities relating to the arrangement. The only joint arrangement owned by the Group is a joint operation which is consolidated using the proportional consolidation method.

Conversion of items denominated in a foreign currency

The consolidated financial statements have been presented in the euros, which is the functional and presentation currency of the parent company.

Transactions in foreign currencies

Transactions in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency at the rates of exchange prevailing on the dates of the transactions. Monetary items have been translated into the functional currency using the rates of exchange as at year-end and non-monetary items using the rates of exchange on the dates of the transactions, excluding items measured at fair value, which have been translated using the rates of exchange on the date of valuation. Gains and losses arising from the translation are recognised in profit or loss. Foreign exchange gains and losses from operations are included within the corresponding items above EBIT. Foreign exchange gains and losses from loans denominated in a foreign currency are included within financial income and expenses.

Translation of foreign Group companies’ financial statements

The income statements of foreign Group companies are translated into euros using the average rate of exchange of the financial year and the statements of financial position using the rates of exchange as at year-end. Differences resulting from the translation of the result for the period at a different rate on the income statement and in the statement of financial position are recognised in other comprehensive income as translation differences within consolidated shareholders’ equity.

Revenue recognition principles

Revenue includes normal sales income from business operations less taxes related to sales and discounts granted. Sales are recognised once the service has been rendered to the customer or once the significant risks and rewards related to the ownership of the goods have been transferred to the buyer. Service revenue is recognised when it is probable that economic benefit will flow to the Group and when the income and costs associated with the transaction can be measured reliably. Revenue and expenses related to long-term projects are recognised on the basis of the percentage of completion when the final outcome of the project can be estimated reliably. The percentage of completion is determined as a proportion of hours worked to the estimated total number of hours of work. When it is likely that total costs to complete the project will exceed total contract revenue, the expected loss is recognised as an expense immediately.

The Group revenue consists mainly of income from voice and data traffic, periodic fees, opening fees and maintenance fees, as well as income from equipment sales. Sales are recognised as revenue once the service has been rendered either on the basis of realised traffic volumes or the validity of a contract. Opening fees are recognised at the time of connection. Revenues from prepaid mobile phone cards are recognised over the period of realised use of the cards. Service fees invoiced from a customer on behalf of a third-party content service provider are not recognised as revenue.

A service contract may include the delivery or rendering of a product and a service or access right (service bundle). The share of revenue attributable to the product is recognised separately from the service revenue.

Long-term service contracts covering a wide range of communications services for corporate customers are recognised over the term of the contract. Customers are usually not entitled to redeem the equipment at the end of the service period.

Customers belonging to loyalty programmes are entitled to certain discounts on services and products provided by the Group. Discounts earned by customers are recognised as reduction of revenue. The Group does not currently have any valid loyalty programmes.

EBIT

Earnings before interest and taxes (”EBIT”) stands for revenue and other operating income less operating expenses (materials and services adjusted by change in inventories, employee expenses and other operating expenses), depreciation and amortisation. 

Current taxes and deferred taxes

The tax expense in the income statement comprises current tax and deferred tax. Income taxes for the financial year are calculated from taxable profit with reference to a valid tax rate and are adjusted by any previous years’ taxes.

Deferred taxes are calculated from all temporary differences arising between tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the consolidated financial statements. The principal temporary differences arise from tax losses carried forward, depreciation differences and fair value measurements in business combinations. Deferred tax is not recognised on goodwill impairment, which is not deductible for tax purposes. Deferred tax is not recognised on non-distributable profits of subsidiaries as far as there is no profit distribution decision in the foreseeable future. No deferred tax is recognised on valuation differences of shares for which the gain on sale would be tax-deductible.

Deferred income tax assets are recognised only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profit will be available against which the temporary differences can be utilised. Deferred tax liabilities are recognised on the balance sheet in total.

Interest and dividends

Interest income is recognised using the effective interest method, and dividend income is recognised when the right to receive payment is established.

Intangible Assets

Goodwill

Goodwill arising from business combinations prior to 2004, is accounted for in accordance with the previous financial statements regulations and the book value is the assumed IFRS acquisition cost. Business combinations incurring between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2009 have been accounted for in accordance with IFRS 3 (2004). Goodwill arising from business combinations incurring after 1 January 2010 represents the excess of the consideration transferred over the Group’s interest in the net fair value of the identifiable net assets acquired and the amount of non-controlling interest and in a business combination achieved in stages, the acquisition-date fair value of the equity interest.

Goodwill is not amortised. Goodwill is tested for impairment annually or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate a potential impairment. For the purpose of impairment testing, goodwill is allocated to the cash-generating units (CGU’s) including Consumer Customers and Corporate Customers. Goodwill is carried at its cost less any accumulated impairment losses.

Research and development

Research costs are recorded as an expense in the income statement. Development expenses are recognised in the statement of financial position from the date the product is technically feasible, it can be utilised commercially and future economic benefit is expected from the product. Otherwise development costs are recorded as an expense. Development costs initially recognised as expenses are not capitalised at a later date.

Other intangible assets

An intangible asset is recognised only if it is probable that the expected future economic benefits that are attributable to the asset will flow to the Group and the cost of the asset can be measured reliably. Subsequent costs related to intangible assets are capitalised only if the future economic benefits that will flow to the Group exceed the level of performance originally assessed. In other cases, the costs are recognised as an expense as incurred.

Other intangible assets are measured at original acquisition cost and amortised on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful life. In connection with business combinations, intangible assets (such as customer base and brand) are measured at fair value.

Amortisation periods for intangible assets:
 
Customer base 4–5 years
Brand 10 years
Development expenses 3 years
IT software 5 years
Other intangible assets 5–10 years

Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are recognised in the statement of financial position at the original cost. Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairments. Depreciation is recorded on a straight-line basis over the useful lives. The residual value and the useful life of an asset is reviewed at year-end and adjusted as necessary.

Subsequent costs, such as renewals and major renovation projects, are capitalised when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the Group. Ordinary repair, service and maintenance costs are recognised as an expense during the financial period in which they are incurred.

Expected useful lives of property, plant and equipment:
   
Buildings and constructions 25–40 years
Machinery and equipment in buildings 10­–25 years
Telecommunications network (line, backbone, area,
subscription, cable TV)
8–15 years
Exchanges and concentrators (fixed and mobile core) 6–10 years
Equipment for the network and exchanges 3–8 years
Telecommunication terminals 1–4 years
Other machinery and equipment 3–5 years

Land areas are not depreciated.

Government grants

Government grants related to the acquisition of property, plant and equipment, are recorded as a reduction of the carrying value of property, plant and equipment. The grants are recognised in income as lower depreciation charges over the useful life of the asset.

Government grants associated with development projects are recognised as other operating income when the related costs are recognised as expenses. Government grants associated with capitalised development costs are recorded as a reduction of cost.

Financial assets and liabilities

Financial assets

The Group classifies its financial assets as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss, loans and receivables and financial assets available-for-sale. The classification of financial assets takes place at initial recognition and depends on the purpose for which the financial assets were acquired. The purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on the settlement date. Financial assets are derecognised once the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or once all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset have substantially been transferred outside the Group.

Financial assets recognised at fair value through profit or loss are included in current assets. This category includes money market funds and commercial paper. Investments in money market funds consist of funds that make investments in high-quality euro-denominated fixed income securities issued by enterprises and public corporations operating in the European Economic Area. Commercial paper consists of debt securities issued by Finnish companies with good credit rating. Both realised and unrealised gains and losses from changes in fair value are recognised in profit or loss during the financial period in which they incur.

Derivatives are recognised at fair value as financial assets or liabilities on the date of acquisition and are subsequently measured again at their fair value. The recognition of changes in the fair value of derivatives depends on the use of the derivative contract. Outstanding derivatives that do not qualify for hedge accounting are recognised at fair value and the changes in fair value are immediately recognised within the financial items in the income statement. The fair value of derivatives is expected to approximate the quoted market price or, if this is not available, fair value is estimated using commonly used valuation methods.

Elisa started hedge electricity purchases by derivatives during 2014. Derivative contracts are treated as cash flow hedges. The effective portion of derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting is recognised in the revaluation reserve of equity (included in the item "Other reserves"). The gains and losses in equity accumulated from the hedging instrument are recognised in the income statement when the hedged item affects the profit or loss. The ineffective portion is recognised in the income statement in other operative income or expenses. The change in the revaluation reserve recognised in equity is presented in the statement of comprehensive income under cash flow hedging. Hedge accounting is discontinued when the hedging instrument expires or is sold or the contract is terminated or exercised. Any cumulative gains or losses existing in equity at that time remain in equity until the predicted transaction has occurred.

Loans and receivables are valued at amortised cost and are included either in current financial assets, or in non-current financial assets if they fall due within more than 12 months. In addition to loan receivables, this category includes trade receivables and other receivables. Trade receivables are recognised at the original invoiced amount. The Group recognises an impairment loss on trade receivables if the payment is delayed by more than 90 days or if a sales receivable is considered to be finally lost. To the extent that trade receivables are sold, the impairment loss is reduced.

Financial assets available-for-sale are included in non-current assets. Equity investments, excluding investments in associated companies and mutual real estate companies, are classified as financial assets available-for-sale and are generally measured at fair value. Values of securities that cannot be measured reliably are reported at cost less impairment. Fair values of financial assets available-for-sale are measured either on the basis of the value of comparable companies, using the discounted cash flow method or by using quoted market rates. Changes in the fair value of equity investments are recognised in other comprehensive income. When the equity investment is sold, accumulated changes in fair value are released from shareholders’ equity and recognised in profit or loss.

Items measured at fair value are categorised using the three-level value hierarchy. Level 1 includes instruments with quoted prices in active markets. Listed shares owned by the Group are categorised at Level 1. Level 2 includes instruments with observable prices based on market data. The Group’s Interest rate and currency swap and electricity derivatives are categorised at Level 2. Level 3 includes instruments with prices that are not based on verifiable market data but instead on the company’s internal information, for example. The contingent consideration relating to business combinations are categorised at Level 3. See Note 17.

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash at bank and in hand, short-term bank deposits and other short-term highly liquid investments with maturity less than three months.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are initially recognised at fair value equalling the net proceeds received. Financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost by using the effective interest method. Transaction costs are included within the cost of financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recorded in non-current and current liabilities and they may be non-interest-bearing or interest-bearing.

Impairment

The Group assesses at the end of each reporting period whether there is objective evidence that an asset is impaired. If such evidence exists, the recoverable amount of the asset is assessed. Regardless of any existence of impairment indications, the recoverable amount of goodwill and intangible assets under construction are also annually assessed. The Group does not have any intangible assets with an indefinite useful life. The need for impairment is assessed at the level of cash-generating units.

The recoverable amount of the asset is its fair value less costs of disposal or its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from an asset item or a cash-generating unit. An impairment loss is recognised when the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount. An impairment loss is recognised immediately in the income statement. If an impairment loss is allocated to a cash-generating unit, it is first allocated to reduce the carrying amount of any goodwill allocated to the cash-generating unit and then to the other assets of the unit on a pro rata basis. An impairment loss is reversed if there are indications that a change in circumstances has taken place and the asset’s recoverable amount has changed since the impairment loss was recognised. However, the reversal of an impairment loss will never exceed the carrying amount of the asset had no impairment loss been recognised. An impairment loss recognised for goodwill is never reversed under any circumstances.

Inventories

Inventories are stated at the cost of an acquisition or at the net realisable value if lower than the cost. The cost is determined using a weighted average price.

Treasury shares

Elisa shares owned by the parent company (treasury shares) are reported as a deduction from equity.

Provisions and contingent liabilities

A provision is recognised when the company has a legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate of the amount of the obligation can be made.

Contingent liabilities are possible obligations that arise from past events and their existence is confirmed only by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the entity. Contingent liabilities also include present obligations that arise from past events but where it is not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligations or the amount of the obligations cannot be measured with sufficient reliability. Contingent liabilities are not recognised in the statement of financial position. Contingent liabilities are presented in the notes.

Employee benefits

Pension obligations

Pensions are classified as either defined contribution or defined benefit plans. In a defined contribution plan, the Group has no legal or constructive obligation to pay further contributions if the fund is unable to pay all employees the benefits relating to employee service. The premiums for defined contribution pension plans are recognised as expenses during the financial year in which they incur. A defined benefit plan is a pension plan that is not a defined contribution plan.

The Group's defined benefit obligation has been calculated separately from each plan by using the projected unit credit method. Pension expenses calculated by authorised actuaries are recognised in profit or loss over the employees’ working lives. The rate used to discount the present value of the defined benefit obligation is determined by reference to market yields of high-quality corporate bonds if such information is not available, the market yields on government bonds are used. The maturity of corporate bonds and government bonds are substantially consistent with the maturity of pension obligations. The present value of defined benefit obligation is reduced by the fair value of the plan assets at the end of the reporting period. The net defined benefit pension liability is recognised in the statement of financial position.

Current service cost and net interest of the net defined benefit liability are recorded in employee expenses in the income statement. The remeasurements of the net defined benefit liability, for example actuarial gains and losses and the return on plan assets, are recognised in other comprehensive income during the financial period in which they incur.

Performance-based bonus scheme and personnel fund

All employees are included in a performance, incentive or commission -based bonus scheme. The Group also has a personnel fund. The costs for the performance-based bonus scheme and personnel fund are recognised on an accrual basis, and the costs are based on the best available estimate of realised amounts.

Share-based incentives

The aim of the Group’s share-based incentive plans is the long-term commitment of senior management to the improvement of the company’s value. The amount of the possible award to be paid is tied to the accomplishment of the related targets. Share-based incentive plans are measured at fair value at the date of granting and are charged to the income statement as follows: the cash portion of the reward is allocated until the end of the month preceding the month of the actual payment and the share portion of the reward is allocated over the restriction period. The proportion settled in shares is recognised in equity, while the proportion settled in cash is recognised as a liability. If the assumption regarding the realised number of shares changes, an adjustment is recorded through profit and loss. The fair value of the portion settled in cash shall be reassessed at the end of each financial period until the end of the month preceding the month during which the reward is paid. Transfer restrictions related to the scheme are not taken into account in fair valuation or expense recognition. The plans do not involve any other non-market based terms and conditions.

Leases

The group as a lessee

Leases in which the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases. Payments made under operating leases are charged to the income statement on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease.

Leases of tangible assets, in which the Group has substantially all the risks and rewards of the ownership, are classified as finance leases. Assets acquired on finance leases are recognised in the statement of financial position at the beginning of the lease period at the lower of the fair value of the leased asset or the present value of future minimum lease payments. Assets acquired under finance leases are depreciated over the useful life of the asset or the lease period, if this is shorter. Minimum lease payments are apportioned between financial expenses and the reduction of the outstanding liability over the lease period so as to produce a constant periodic rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability. Finance lease liabilities are recognised in interest-bearing liabilities. The Group has primarily leased telecommunications networks and facilities, servers and work stations, videoconferencing equipment and infrastructure under finance leases.

The group as a lessor

The Group acts as a lessor in two different types of lease arrangements that are accounted for operating leases. Rental income from telecom premises and carrier services is recognised as revenue over the lease period. Rental income from apartment leases is recorded in other operating income over the lease period.

The Group acts as a lessor in lease arrangements for video conferencing equipment that are accounted for as finance leases. At the time of sale of the equipment, the proceeds are recorded as revenue and a receivable at present value. Rental income is recorded as financial income and as a reduction of the receivable over the lease period reflecting a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment.

Accounting policies that require management’s judgements and sources of estimation uncertainty

The preparation of financial statements requires the application of judgment in making estimates and assumptions. Actual results may differ from the estimates and assumptions made. In addition, the application of the accounting principles also requires the application of judgment. The estimates are based on the management’s best view at the end of the financial period. Any changes in estimates and assumptions are recognised in the financial year during which the estimate or assumption is adjusted and in all subsequent periods.

Impairment testing

Goodwill and intangible assets under construction are tested for impairment annually or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate a potential impairment. The recoverable amount of cash-generating units is determined by calculations based on value in use, the preparation of which requires estimates and assumptions. The main uncertainties are associated with the estimated level of revenue and profitability and the discount rate. Any changes may lead to the recognition of impairment losses. The carrying value of goodwill was EUR 879.8 million on 31 December 2016. See Note 15.

Share-based incentive plans

The expense recognition for the share-based incentive plans is based on an estimate of the fulfilment of the share incentive plan criteria and the development of Elisa's share price. The fulfilment of the share incentive plan criteria and the development of the share price might deviate from the estimates. Share-based compensation expenses were EUR 8.3 million in 2016 and the liability relating to share-based incentive plans as at 31 December 2016 was EUR 10.7 million. See Note 27.

Income and expenses

The measurement and allocation of income and expenses to the appropriate financial period is partially based on estimates from past experience.

Deferred tax assets

Particularly at the end of each financial period, the Group assesses the probability of subsidiaries generating taxable income against which unused tax losses can be utilised. The appropriateness for recognising other deferred tax assets is also determined as at the end of each financial period. Changes in the estimates may lead to the recognition of significant tax expenses. As at 31 December 2016, the Group had EUR 24.6 million deferred tax receivables.

Application of new and revised accounting pronouncements under IFRS

On 1 January 2018, the Group will adopt the following new standards, providing these are approved by the EU by the planned date of adoption.

  • IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers. The new standard includes a single, principles-based, five-step model for the recognition of revenue from agreements with customers. According to IFRS 15, sales revenue must be allocated to performance obligations based on relative transaction prices. A performance obligation is defined as a promise to transfer to the customer a goods and/or services. The recognition takes place over time or at a specific point in time, and a key criterion is the passing of control.

Elisa started preparations for the implementation of the standard in 2015 by preparing a top-level analysis of the key change areas. It has been assessed that the implementation of the standard will have a major impact on data systems and the reporting processes. No major changes in Elisa’s financial reporting are to be expected, nor will the implementation of the standard influence the cash flow. Elisa has launched a separate project to manage the planning and implementation of the process changes required due to the standard and the change management.

No major changes to the current concepts of “goods” and “services” will occur in Elisa due to the identification of the performance obligations. Fixed-term service agreements and service agreements valid until further notice are performance obligations that are recognised over time, and goods are performance obligations that are recognised at a specific point in time.

According to the current recognition principles, service agreements valid until further notice are recognised monthly, and sales revenue is recognised less any granted discounts. According to the current recognition principles, the opening fees of service agreements valid until further notice and related expenses are recognised at the time when the service is connected.

Fixed-term service agreements are recognised during the agreement period, and as an exception from the current recognition principles, the opening fees of fixed-term service agreements and related expenses are, in most cases, allocated for the entire agreement period. Discounts on fixed-term service agreements are usually allocated for the entire agreement period.

Service agreements with corporate customers usually meet the IFRS 15 criteria laid down for an agreement negotiated as a single package, in which case the service agreement will be processed as a single agreement, and the transaction price will be allocated to the performance obligations based on the prices agreed with each customer. Agreements with consumer customers are usually standard agreements that are not agreements negotiated as a single package in the manner laid down in IFRS 15; instead, they are processed as separate performance obligations.

  • IFRS 9 Financial Instruments. In accordance with the standard, financial assets are measured at fair value unless certain conditions require measurement at amortised cost. The measurement models have also been simplified. The standard will change hedge accounting and offer a new way of assessing impairments. The recognition of expected impairments happens at the beginning of the contract. The change does not have a significant impact on the Group's financial statements.

On 1 January 2019, the Group will adopt the following new standard, providing it is approved by the EU by the planned date of adoption.

  • IFRS 16 Leases. In respect of the lessor, the situation will remain largely unchanged. In respect of the lessee, all leases except short-term (less than a 12-month) contracts and contracts with low value will be recognised on the balance sheet. The change will move off-balance sheet liabilities to the balance sheet and thus increase the amount of lease property and debt. The amount of off-balance sheet liabilities on 31 December 2016 was EUR 93.0 million. The concepts of agreements processed as off-balance sheet liabilities and the concepts used in IFRS 16 are somewhat different from each other, which is why the number of agreements recognised on the balance sheet may differ from the number of off-balance sheet liabilities. The lease contracts recognised on the balance sheet are mainly from business premises and telecom facilities. The change does have a material impact on the Group's financial statements. The change will also affect the key indicators based on the balance sheet, such as gearing.

 

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